Pakistan claims India won’t be able to use Afghan soil against Pakistan

Pakistan hopes that after the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, India wouldn’t be able to use Afghan soil against Pakistan, Fawad Chaudhary, Pakistan’s information and technology minister said

Sep 01, 2021
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Pakistan, Fawad Chaudhary, Pakistan’s information and technology minister

Pakistan hopes that after the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan, India wouldn’t be able to use Afghan soil against Pakistan, Fawad Chaudhary, Pakistan’s information and technology minister said. 

For years, Pakistan has been accusing New Delhi of using Afghan soil to "destabilize" Pakistan through what they say "promoting terrorism and separatism”. However, with the return of the Taliban, a group considered closely aligned with Islamabad, the latter now hopes New Delhi won’t be able to do so. 

“The new Afghan authorities have come up with a clear stance and we hope they won’t allow Afghanistan’s soil to be used against any country and there would be a reduction in Indian mischief and funding to use Afghan soil against Pakistan,” Chaudhary was quoted as saying by Dawn newspaper. 

The remark came after Pakistan Cabinet held a meeting on Tuesday to discuss the situation in Afghanistan.

Chaudhary added that Pakistan will continue to help Afghanistan to form an inclusive government there. The Taliban toppled the US-backed Afghan government on 15 August with a lightning offensive that caught the international community and major powers off guard. 

As the US’ costly 20-year project in Afghanistan comes to what many say an ignominious end, the debate on the subversive role played by Pakistan has been growing. Last week, Republican Congressman Michael G. Waltz sent a letter to US President Joe Biden, urging him to sanction Pakistan for its alleged support to Taliban militants. 

Responding to the allegation, Pakistan Ambassador to the US Asad Majeed Khan said US lawmakers mischaracterized his country’s role in the fall of Kabul. 

“The contention that Pakistan’s ‘military strategy’ was somehow the decisive factor in the defeat of the 300,000-strong Afghan National Defence and Security Forces (ANDSF) does not square with the US government’s own assessments,” he was quoted as saying by Dawn. 

(SAM)