Pakistan PM Imran Khan says Taliban can’t win over whole of Afghanistan

The Taliban, the main Afghan insurgent group, can’t take over the whole of Afghanistan, said Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, adding any attempt to do so will lead to a long civil war

Jun 22, 2021
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Pakistan PM Imran Khan

The Taliban, the main Afghan insurgent group, can’t take over the whole of Afghanistan, said Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan, adding any attempt to do so will lead to a long civil war. 

In an opinion piece published in The Washington Post, Khan said, “We oppose any military takeover of Afghanistan, which will lead only to decades of civil war, as the Taliban cannot win over the whole of the country, and yet must be included in any government for it to succeed.”

He also said that Pakistan was ready to be a partner for peace in Afghanistan with the United States, but would not allow US military bases on its soil. He warned that terrorists would again target Pakistan if they allow their bases to Americans for bombing in Afghanistan. 

“After joining the US efforts, Pakistan was targeted as a collaborator, leading to terrorism against our country from the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and other groups,” Khan claimed. “US drone attacks, which I warned against, didn’t win the war, but they did create hatred for Americans, swelling the ranks of terrorist groups against both our countries.''

Highlighting their efforts to bring the Taliban to the negotiation table, Khan said it was in the interest of everyone to have a negotiated end to the war in Afghanistan. He hoped that the Afghan government will also show more flexibility in the talks, and stop blaming Pakistan, as the country is doing everything it can short of military action.

Significantly, Khan’s oped came days before Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and chief peace negotiator Abdullah Abdullah are to meet US President Joe Biden on Friday this week. 

(SAM)

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