Taliban allows girls’ school to open in Herat city ahead of UN credential committee meet

The Taliban, the new rulers of Afghanistan, has allowed the girls’ schools of higher secondary level to open in the western city of Herat, almost after three months after the group captured power

Nov 09, 2021
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Taliban allows girls’ school to open in Herat city

The Taliban, the new rulers of Afghanistan, has allowed the girls’ schools of higher secondary level to open in the western city of Herat, almost after three months after the group captured power. The arrangement, however, is local in nature as the hardline Islamist group has allowed girls to school only in a handful of Afghan cities. 

No official confirmation has been issued by the Taliban representatives on the opening the schools for girls in Herat, the provincial capital of the province with the same name. Reports, citing parents in the city, showed that girls of classes between 6th standard to 12th standard have been attending schools for the last three days. 

Officials were under pressure from the community leaders. Herat, the country’s third-largest city and the biggest in the western part, is considered relatively less conservative in comparison to the areas in southern and eastern Afghanistan.

Historically, the city has a rich culture of educating girls even in higher studies courses. For instance, prior to the fall of Kabul, over 60 percent of students enrolled in Herat University were girls. Women used to form a significant portion of the workforce in the city and had been engaged in various businesses. 

Importantly, the move came just weeks before the nine-member UN credential committee, which includes countries like Russia and the US, is scheduled to hold a meeting on the Taliban’s claim on being the legitimate rulers of Afghanistan. Although the group is more than keen to get acceptance from the international community, no country-- except Pakistan--has advocated for the regime’s recognition. 

Almost three months after the Taliban seized power in Afghanistan on 15 August, toppling the US-backed Afghan government, leaders of the group made no significant efforts in addressing the concerns of the international communities.

Russia, which has tactically backed the Taliban’s return to power, too, has been asking the regime to adopt moderate policies on human rights and girls’ education. Earlier, Moscow had also said they were not in a hurry to accord legitimacy to the Taliban government. 

(SAM) 

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